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effort in the state of california and in the country of the united states to try to roll back the horrendous rates of incarceration that have happened in this country over the last 30 years. i mean, that's the context, right? the united states, i think most of you know these numbers now, but we're less than 5% of the world's population but almost 25% of the world's incarcerated population. we rank first in the world in the per capita incarceration of our fellow citizens. the russians are fading fast in second or third place together with the belarus people. the rates of the incarceration are five, six, seven, eight times than most in other societies, europe and elsewhere, though their rates of nonviolent crime and drug use are not that much different than ours. so if another country were to lock up its own people at the rate that we do, and if our rates of incarceration were more normative to the rest of the world, we would regard with that other country was doing as a massive violation of human rights. that's the way we would look at it. now, the other point here is what we'r
with all of us across the united states who really want to understand and help, um, the military family members who have served in the defense of our country to come back into their communities and to really be fully integrated and fully reintegrated into their communities. and i think that we all carry a sense of ownership and a sense of responsibility about that community. and no longer are military families isolated. and no longer should people who have served in the military only be either in military communities. we really have to embrace them as a national community: in our neighborhoods, in our schools, and, in that way, i think, we show our respect for the work that they have done. and, in fact, we want to embrace and be joyful about their service. and, at the same time, help them become the civilian members as they leave the military, the civilian members of the community that they can. i think it's all part of our national defense, it's all part of our national security. excellent. barbara, and broaden for us the definition of what a military family is. in the past, we looked
expand? interestingly moscone is probably the most successful convention center in the united states. it's not the largest. but persquare foot, it's the most utilized. per square foot it generated the most hotel nights and most revenue of any convention center in the united states. so it's very significant in terms of economic impact. it's basically full-year round. a lost our groups are outgrowing it and need more space in order to stay in town and this benefits not only the tourist sector, but the business sector. it's no coincide that the apple 5 was unveiled there this week or oracle is having their meeting next week. it's the best way to generate more business. the economic impact of the center is significant. we have calculated that we have lost $2 billion in spending because the building is not big enough and people have left. people that want to meet in san francisco or come back over a regular cycle are not able to meet here because it's too small. so we have to expand and once we do, it will create jobs, revenue and taxes for the city. we have a whole expansion team. it's' p
right. thank you. mr. crowley. >> muni moves more than bart. it's the biggest in the united states. for the on time performance it's tough to get around traffic and mitigation but they have a plan afoot and bypass areas that have bus stops on every block and that is one way to improve performance. as far as free muni for kids i support that but in practice we don't have the budget to support it and that's my stance today. thank you. >> okay. >> i took muni to get here tonight. i share a car with my partner so two days a week when he works in the city i get the car and when he's in silicon valley i am on muni. big picture we're not going to fix it on time and most is on the service and there are traffic jams and again instead of spending billions of dollars and doesn't connect to the existing muni and tunneling down geary where it's needed and as far as free muni for youth does it make sense we're hundreds of thousands of dollars in deficit and give free fares and people say they need to take it to school and that brings up a issue why aren't they going to neighborhood schools.
literate cities in the united states. multiple reading events are happening every night of the year, competing against a big names like city arts and lectures. radar was voted the winner of these san francisco contest. after two decades of working for free, michelle is able to make radar her full-time job. >> i am a right to myself, but i feel like my work in this world is eagerly to bring writers together and to produce literary events. if i was only doing my own work, i would not be happy. it is, like throwing a party or a dinner party. i can match that person with that person. it is really fun for me. it is nerve wracking during the actual readings. i hope everyone is good. i hope the audience likes them. i hope everybody shows up. but everything works out. at the end of the reading, everyone is happy. ♪ >> this is a dpw corporation yard. i work for the bureau of street environmental services used to be street cleaning. we are a new age. >> here we are. >> here we are. >> clean. >> these are our communications dispatchers. hi. okay, no problem. you are welcome. bye-bye. >>
of the united states will play a strong part in the development of these vehicles. as well as we also started a venture firm. the venture fund operates out of new york. it started 15 months ago, we made our first investment in a company called my city way, which is working on intermodal transport. started in new york, now in 35 cities around the country and many cities around the world provided information to not only our customers, but also anyone interested in moving from a to be in a city. that has worked exceedingly well. as you have seen, we have been investing in other companies as well. the electric charging stations system is another one of those. as is our first in this and in parking. most of us leave our house is in the morning, go to work, part of our cars at work, leave a vacant parking space at home. if you can bring a marketplace together where someone can park under drive during the day, and of course, give them a certainty of where they will part, it works. many thousands of customers now are enjoying that has a potential different way of operating in the city. drive now was
to the united states as children and who meet other specific requirements and whereas mission high school community members came before the board of education on august 14, 2012 to announce their leadership efforts in making this national opportunity a reality for not just mission high school students but all eligible students in sfusd as rapidly as possible recognizing this program has no accompanying federal funding nor state allocated resources, to understand the guidelines, apply for consideration and ward off fraudulent prospectors in this arena. therefore be it resolved with the board of education with the san francisco unified school district hereby encourages the superintendent and staff to volunteer their free time and expert's to assist mission high school with its two-day action forum. friday september 7, 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. and saturday september 8, 9:00 to 12:00 p.m. including but not limited to the translation of materials and provision of interpretors to assist with the provision of information to families. further be it resolved that the board of education encourages them to
's going to take all of us to get this united states back where it belongs. we're not there yet, but we can be there. grumbles: water is america's greatest liquid asset. and citizens and governments all need to be reminded of that from time to time. woman: what can individuals do to make a difference? allbee: we need to accept the responsibility that future generations need to be able to rely on those assets to have the same quality of life that we have. oberstar: all the water there ever was or ever will be is here on earth today and it's our responsibility now, at this time, in this generation, to protect it. that must be our legacy to the future. ♪ >> welcome to hamilton recreation and aquatics center. it is the only facility that has an integrated swimming pool and recreation center combined. we have to pools, the city's water slide, for little kids and those of you that are more daring and want to try the rockslide, we have a drop slide. >> exercises for everybody. hi have a great time. the ladies and guys that come, it is for the community and we really make it fun. people think it
? that is how to divide and conquer. that is the way the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization contact the task force for speaking engagements? >> if you call and ask to speak to jim miller. >> is there any effort to formalize the relationship with a community-based organization? >> right now, we do not have that effort in place. it is a good idea, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training fo
of recovery. his city is a model for the rest of the united states to emulate. the honorable edwin lee. [applause] ç>> thank you. next time i see mayor willie brown, i will remind him it was fema. [laughter] we will have to name a doorway in addition to the staircase. thank you, everyone, for coming to san francisco. it is a pleasure to receive new and open up our house and to have you discuss, plan, and create relationships perhaps you do not have today among the federal and local police -- agencies working together on recovery. our city has been working hard. we have seen the future. the future is that if we're not prepared, it will not be our future. i got a glimpse of that some years ago when staff and i went down to new orleans. we have begun to realize the devastation was the result of things that could have been done there are national lessons to be learned from any major disaster across our country, what we could have done better. when i visited there those years ago, we stood at the night éovardç -- at the ninthç ward. in addition to taking pictures, we just stood there
of the united states of america. into the republic, for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. thank you. you can have a seat. i would like to acknowledge and introduce some of the people we have on the stage with us. first, at the police commission president, thomas mazzucco, commissioner kingsley, paul henderson from the mayor's office as representing because the mayor was unable to come tonight. also, we have commissioner loftus. also, the command at steep. d staff. deputy chief james that lake, lyn tomioka, leanora militello, and next to lyn commander biel, corrier from field comman. i would like to introduce chief grigory p. suhr. >> good evening, and hopefully lyn still wants to be your boss tomorrow. i know it is quiet and there are a lot of kids in the room. that is terrific. the medal of valor ceremony is the best event that we get to attend. it is when there is a crisis, emergency, extreme danger and takes everything you have to go forward, and everyone else that would want to run away, the people you will hear about tonight not only
in our lifetimes we would see an african-american president of the united states. what a wonderful location, that is something to celebrate. he has been here many times, president obama. the very surprised we had of being able to celebrate the first asian mayor of san francisco. it was not my doing, it was all of the people of san francisco saying it is about time we celebrate. thank you to the people of san [applause] i have a very short message. what did i have felt very strongly in my first elected year, but also during my tenure as interim mayor. we have a great deal of celebrate. we also have a great challenge in front of us. there are so many of our asian american friends, iranian friends, friends from the philippines, friends from our japanese-american community, are chinese-american community, waiting for the opportunity to come together to celebrate our diversity, but also to signal to our european friends, our latino france, we are ready to help lead this state. and helped change the conversation and not only celebrate diversity, but use diversity for our strength. that i
of shares that makes me feel safe. given that there is a lot of trafficking of women in united states and, some say, in san francisco, i would ask that all of his efforts that have been put toward ross be put toward all of these crimes against women, much more serious human crimes. i would ask that we reevaluate the situation and hold hearings on matters of severe concern to the city and county of san francisco. thank you and have a great day. [applause] >> money ms. lindsay. -- my name is lindsay. my son and lies in the san francisco police department and he thinks this is a travesty, because he knows of many instances that are much more severe that are not prosecuted. this is a very minor domestic violence case. i can only see it as a consolidation of power, political power kind of effort. the last hearing, there was very instructive testimony by a lesbian woman, who was credentialed as much as a domestic violence worker. in her case, she was one of the first people to talk to ms. lopez. you could hear in the background begging them not to call police. this is a case that has been blown
record 98 disasters declared in the united states. about 0.5% or five of those, we deployed in federal disaster recovery coordinator to work with the communities and works through the issues. we still have folks out there from hud and other agencies providing recover its support functions. whether it is presidentially declared or not, who do you need out there immediately to have your communityñr and the citizes taking care of as it looks to rebuild? this can go on on a daily basis in the things you do. çwhenever there is a house fir, we see the red cross helping to make sure people have immediate needs taken care of. last year with hurricane irene along the eastç coast, we have3 states impacted by that. there was all the work that had to happen with the crossing over and integrating of support functions providing resources needed for the communities we did needed by the committees for recovery. i have gone on for quite a while. i wanted to set the stage for you and encourage you to dialogue. bring your comments. i hope i have stirred up some pots, things you want to know more abo
. after the united states would not give him his visa, i asked him -- i told him about mutanabbi street and he wrote a poem and he wrote it in english, though he writes in, of course, in arabic. but this one he wrote in english. so i'll read it. one figure in the poem you should know, humbaba, which is an ogre, a monster of immemorial age. that was a special big garden, a forest, where all types of trees and flowers grew. the trees bending down gently flinging branches. our orchard grew like a crown on the sun's eyebrow. where did humbaba come from? his mother was just a cave, his father unknown. who made him a friend pretending guardian of the orchard. did those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who crowned him king? who showed him our garden was but a jail? humbaba was great and scary, but not so ve
from all or the united states. >> they were overwhelmed with the same chance to get married. >> we started to get them couple by couple and that line starting going down the hall way, around the block and continued over the weekend. they drove from washington, oregon, we saw families and hoping they would get through the door before we closed down for the day and the next day they want come back. we had very little time to plan. >> in 2004, when the city opened up marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples we were here. and then got in and got married. we were so appreciative for the city to do this and make it available. it was for chaos. >> in 2004, we had no idea what to expect. we had originally wanted to marry under the 9:00 a.m. court opening. meaning we were trying to do it in a way where we could get the first marriage under the bell before the courts came in to stop us. what we didn't know was what we didn't know. it's going about things and not knowing the consequences. we had to quickly organize a way to get through the enormity of requests to get married >> later tha
today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san francisco as a criminal prosecutor and civil rights attorney. i got to understand how much o
the same thing with cycling. in the united states, many people, especially in big cities, are much more resistant to the idea, including individual motorists, not just businesses afraid of profit. i am wondering, i am not sure how much a european have met with people who are very resistant, thinking it is like socialism, people just want to
of preventable deaths in the united states, and the two major factors that have reduced smoking in san francisco from about 20% to about 11.9% from 190 to now are snoak-free laws and tobacco taxes and that would be -- the -- if we were to allow smoking in this facility. >> so the department of public health is asking the board to please uphold the 30 day suspension because the business knowingly and repeatedly violated the ordinance since the first meeting in june 2010. the department also is asking the board to help send a message to the public and business owners that smoking is not -- will not be allowed in prohibited areas. and the only way we can do that is by upholding the cease and desist order which includes removal of the smoking devices from the cafe. thank you. >> vice president fung: ms. young, two questions. one is the no employees -- i saw that in the bar or tavern designation. does that also apply to tobacco shop? >> first of all, i just wanted to let you know that when i did my inspections in may and june -- february and may, and when i went there last night as well, they have em
and sustainable terminals and the united states. the public art program continues its 30-year legacy of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the oth
united states, which i think is important. i think it was a really good presentation. reminds me of the time we were considering another issue some years ago. this happened to be 555 washington. many nights i would run to maritime plaza and try to imagine that one sliver of time when the sunlight might go past the buildings that were blocking maritime plaza. i don't know if i was ever long enough to stay that sliver of time there might be a shadow cast on a park during the time i was doing my run. i think that is instructive. of course the part of the few shadow is very important. if you are a long ways a way, it is an analogy to twilight. you block part by this distance building, some perforated in the case of the transbay tower, but you still get a lot of the light that turns around through the perforation, around the connicle top. * and there is a difference between a full and diffused shadow. you pointed out parks in the heavily shaded areas, as it is. there are times -- while we love the sun in san francisco, because you have a cool climate, there are times you want to be in
and largest state in the nation to approve this. one decade later, we have full voting rights in the united states. helping newly enfranchised women, a new political movement was founded. >> starting in the 1920's, it was a movement created by the suffragettes moving forward to getting the right to vote. all of the suffragettes were interested in educating the new voters. >> non-partisan, not endorsing candidates >> -- endorsing candidates, getting the right to vote and one they have their voice heard. >> the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage is taking
of california, and the united states as well. i'm required to do so in a completely even-handed manner. i do so with no problem and with all the love in my heart. that being said, it would be ridiculous, disingenuous and completely unhelpful not to realize that certain segments within our population here in san francisco need help more than others. it would be absolutely preposterous for me to sit up here and tell you that we're going to approach polices of economic advantagement in an even-handed manner. that would do a disservice to and again, we are a weaker city if we allow certain segments of you are population to essentially rot. we're a stronger, vibrant and more resilient city if we address the issues of those least among us, tackle them, and face them head-on. >> thank you. >> that is what i'm about. truth and honesty in our policy approached. >> mr. resignato. >> i think one important thing we need to look at is vision. really, you know? a vision for what san francisco is going to be. and i think that involves looking at a lot of different things. one thing that daniel mentioned
connection. and then we have veterans, and we have veterans who are disbursed all across the united states and may or may not have access to va services. so it is a very important definitional issue. and, captain hunter, let's talk a little bit. kathryn just mentioned the families. how does the family, then, approach an individual who may have a problem? what are some of the issues that they need to be aware of? my experience in the national guard has been that ptsd and mild traumatic brain injuries affect the whole family. one person may be the person who has the disorder or the stress symptoms, but it goes throughout the whole family. you can't not address ptsd without affecting the whole family in that, so to speak, the work that you do, and taking care of someone with ptsd, the family benefits from that. we see that in the national guard all the time, and we see family programs that are dedicated specifically to deal with service members who have ptsd, mild traumatic brain injuries, but a whole host of other reintegration issues. especially now, in the national guard, we're seeing a po
life, which is very different. anyone who has ever deployed, whether it's outside of the united states or even to a disaster here, is going to be affected by that deployment. and that will have an impact on the family. so, yellow ribbon events are meant to bring them back, tell them about what benefits they have, what's out there for them, and to really get eyes on individuals so they can follow up individually with that person about the program or the challenge that they might be dealing with. and some of the other programs you mentioned? yes, there's an employer support for the guard and reserve. one of the things that the employer support, we call it esgr, what they're doing now ... what does that stand for? esgr? yes, employer support for the guard and reserve. what they're doing is they're serving 80,000 employers. so we were talking about homelessness. what we're seeing is sometimes folks get deployed and they come back and they experience something called "underdeployment." they were doing a rather menial job, then they took on a huge responsibility when they were in the service
ever done in the united states. narrator: small-scale projects like nine mile run have far-reaching environmental impact. but they're just one part of the regional wet weather control plan. schombert: this region needs to solve its problem by 2026. that's not that long away. this is the largest public works project ever undertaken in this region. lichte: you're looking at significant infrastructure. either tunnels or storage tanks, or, you know, treatment facilities. the cost is about $3 billion. lichte: if you look at some of the other cities that have gone through this, their rates have gone up significantly. the federal government provides a number of grant programs but the bottom line is, you know, it's not enough. there's a massive need of money out there for wastewater and water infrastructure improvements around the country. narrator: the struggle for funds is as great in small towns as it is in metropolitan areas. oberstar: the federal government has let down municipalities. the first investment under the '72 clean water act was to deal with the biggest waste stream
taxi magic. we are the no. 1 electronic hailing system for taxis in the united states. we work with about 100 plus fleets in about 100 plus cities in the country. working with hundreds of thousands of drivers and millions of consumers all over the country, in san francisco, we work with luxor cab since 2008. for more than four years, our year over year ride brother and growth and this is about data continues to double, but each year our demand has vastly exceeded our supply and what we have realized is that here in san francisco, technology like ours can't solve all of the problems. accordingly san francisco has the highest no-show and cancellations. san francisco is widely known as the most difficult city to get a taxi. as demand for taxis in san francisco has exceeded supply, you are seeing new, unregulated tanki transportation and tech companies enter the market, who are preying opinion the well-known fact it's impossible to get a taxi in san francisco. these taxi replacement companis have introduced hundreds of new vehicles into the city, with very little regulation, while
than we typically get in the united states. it's usually much more cost-effective to manage them outside of a facility with high scrutiny than it is to incarcerate. as you probably know, california spends about eight times as much money for every inmate as it does for every student in the university of california system. and so you could reorganize those resources and put they will more towards supervision and other types of things and manage a lot of those individuals that are currently incarcerated in a much more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but being the easy political solu
than we typically get in the united states. it's usually much more cost-eti
done and almost exclusively as i travel around the united states the places that look like market street 20 years ago have improved. i'm talking about the mid-market area. so there is a way to do it. the linear nation of market might make it a little more difficult with the diversity. and also the great boulevards of the world i think we have to take clues from those as to how did they deal with cars, sidewalks, bike lanes, and those sorts of things because some of these car-free malls are failures particularly you talk about sacramento and other areas you go to where absence of cars has created problems a lot worse but it may not be entirely about the cars. another thing i think you need to encourage in regards to these public spaces is private vendors in the spaces that will -- because their business is dependent upon it, will police the areas, they'll attract first of all a clientele that will be there and you'll see a little bit of this in union square and then they will have control over their areas, and therefore elements of the public that may be disruptive could be asked t
for automotive loans. today, basically 80% of all the loans in the united states are processed through their software. we will see much more of this. we want to talk about not as public companies, tons of this. all of these guys uses the original cloud service. a lot of people have asked me why we call it a cloud. what does this come from? it is pretty simple. in the old days of client-server computing -- some of us were around them -- we would draw a picture of a pc, a picture of a unix server, and then a picture of a little clout in between. mostly because none of us understood how networks work. for the old folks in the room, you may remember certain words. this is all communication technology developed for corporations to build their own networks. that sounds like crazy talk today, right? nobody does that anymore. everybody is using ip, mpls- based networks. that is the network cloud. the network guys realize that in order to build a network service, they had to put these things called switches and routers in a room that had high quality power, guard dogs out front, and not located
could generated synthetically a ton of load coming from multiple sites around united states to simulate every case i just told you about. you technologically could have done that. economically, it would have cost you an arm and leg to do this. which is why nobody did it. today, a whole host of guys are saying, would you like 10,000 computers for three days to generate a ton of synthetic load and hit all these giant websites? you could have that you only have to buy it for three days because they have delivered -- amazon among others has done this. you want to beat a student of this, it to be a student of business models. they have a concept called reserve pricing, meaning if you think you're going to use it for a year, they a little but up front, and they will take the hourly rate down. then they have a fascinating thing called spot pricing, which means that every hour, we can all go bid on whatever excess capacity there is. each you are the high bidder, you get it. there are a lot of interesting applications for this, by the way. this innovation and business model has not stopped. they
the uc davis school of law in 2004, following a clerkship with judge cal braise of the united states court of appeals for the second circuit. interest include election law, administrative law, statutory interpretation, constitutional law and property and natural resources law. he is a resident of san francisco's mission district. we are honored to work chris almendorf. [ applause ] >> thank you very much and thank you to all of the candidates who are here today. we're very fortunate to be joined by six candidates and what i hope will soon be seven. all of the candidates have agreed to ask their supporters to be respectful of other candidates and the audience and to maintain quiet during the forum. i ask you to respect that commitment. every aspect of this forum will be equally fair to all participating candidates. as everyone here knows candidate debates are often limited to latitudinal appears and personal attack. our debate focuses on critical areas of policy disagreement among the leading candidates. so this end the league of women voters of san francisco and the san francisco pu
public schools here in san francisco, throughout the state of california and throughout the united states. as all of you undoubtedly know. with that being said, it's vitally important that those parents still have a say in the education of their children. i would certainly support and promote voting by those parents in school board elections in san francisco. by implication own a community college election would fit in that rubric, to support college advancement to people who have traditionally been put at the margins of our society. in those two elections, i think, are the most fundamental in the sense that they go to the root of advancement in this country and the obtaining of the american dream. so the school board and community college board i would certainly support that. >> thank you, miss olague. >> i don't think there is much to add to that. i know a couple of years ago there was a ballot measure that failed. so i would totally support bringing this back and allowing people to reconsider it. because as mr. everett said, i think it is important for people, especially those who h
for preapprentices. we went through many zip codes, making sure there's state law for apprentice unite lie station, which includeed preapprentice programs. today we have 4 community based organizations. san juaquin, cypress mandella, alameda county, citybuiod, sf county, apoi, san mateo county, proge==ject build. we would like to thank you for your outstanding after fort, and city staff that worked in labor apresent itions on both of the training classes. >> t*fs a pleasure for me to do that, there were some great folk that is came out. i think you know one. success stories happening on one of the (inaudible). i knew from the very fist day that young man came into that program that he would make someone a perfect employee, and he d. it's been profound for me to work with the member members of jtop. i've maerd of you, i've heard your names many times. though, i'm not try to rush you away, i can't recall the entire lines of the poem by langston hughes. in reference to retirement, life is short, aoeltd desert first. [giggles]. mass [applause] >> good evening commissioners : art shanks, hhere wit
is that occurred in california in the late 60's. the strike at san francisco state college was the largest and longest of the actions. and gave birth to a generation who would unite and serve their communities. in the late 1960's san francisco state college students unified to question the meaning of their education. their actions would have a dramatic impact on american colleges and universities. the third world strunt strike lasted 5 months from 68-69 it temporarily shut down the campus and is now the largest college in ethnic studies in the nation. >> san francisco state college drew students from across california in particular from the ethnic groups within san francisco. many students were the first in their families to attend college. >> we have a laundry on polk street my father got called all kinds of ethnic slurs because we would lose somebody's sock i blamed it on ourselves and our family and being born chinese. when i got to state i was quite ripe to hear an alternative story. >> as young people left their ethnic neighborhoods they entered a new community. an academic environ
will tell you it is the largest in the state. so, for the inspectors assigned to that unit's, we tried to engage them to open up. i agree with the gentleman at the end. security is paramount. we feel that as the police department, we want you to please yourself. as the commander mentioned, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan managemen
of the building. >> do you know what that is? >> yes, on the building permit application, it stated there's retail and occupancy and a single family home on r3, a single family dwelling unit and it's a basement type 5 construction, so the existing use is retail and as of this permit, the use does not change, it's still retail. i believe there is a future permit file for a change of use. >> and that is not before us today? >> that is not before us tonight, no. >> okay. >> okay. and i might ask you to come back up after the appellants have spoken. >> so should we hear from the appellant then? >> yes. >> we'll hear from the appellant now, 7 minutes. >> good evening, board members, i'm leon chow, the appellant and probably it will take less than 7 minutes. first, i want to address to the board that, yeah, i do understand that this is an interior permit, but my brief is an argument is opposing the permit on the unit used for the mcd, medical cannabis dispensary, so my argument is that it is not necessarily limited to -- for the details of interior is, and i understand that the permit departments that h
be converted into another unit, which we believe is not allowed under the currently zoning requirement maximum. going to the guidelines they state to articulate the building, maximum impact on the light and privacy to following propertis the following modifications can -- it can impact light on the property. * and the recommendations provide setbacks on the upper floors. right now there are no setbacks other than the front, rear. the side is really important. if you look at the current structure it is actually set back. we would like the new one to be set back as well. it also asks that we -- guidelines say shared light wells, provide more light to both properties. this plan would reduce the light tremendously to the light well and incorporate open railing is a design requirement. now the plan calls for a wall. on privacy, again, the design requirements states that developed window configurations that break the line of sight between house in plan calls for new windows in the light well that do reduce our privacy. one is substantially larger than is currently there. thinking about the building'
concern that was raised not stated in both d.r. applications but during process and review of applications, that is additional unit, disruptive property concept and alleged second unit, which was illegally constructed without building permit, occupied single-family's basement floor with independent access to and from the street. the two concerns regarding parking space removed from garage and this alleged second-door unit has been investigated by housing inspection as well as the department's code enforcement division. the parking space was ready and available once it was inspected. the alleged second door on the unit was not found in inspection. both have been abated by both agencies. this application has been reviewed multiple times by the department's residential design team. prior to mailing out the second building permit notification. reviewed again after both d.r. applications were filed, as well as reviewed by the department's senior management. it is determined that the project would not result in any exceptional or extraordinary circumstances; that no further changes to the final
and my understanding is most of these buildings contain housing in the upper units almost exclusively, it's pretty much all retail, i think the rest have housing and you already said that they're consistent with the general plan for the reasons stated and then the final one was the sustainable communities and what's more sustainable than keeping what we've already got and not having to tear it down and build something new, so it seems that this is extremely well thought of and these are beautiful buildings and i agree also with ms. esther the ground floors need a little work because often we assess the character of a building and we don't -- or maybe are distracted by its beauty by what may be going on in the first floor, perhaps not the use but works well with the building itself or is appealing in and of *it for people to be drawn to the thing but that's an ongoing process and as things hopefully begin to become more economically viable along market particularly, this part of market, these buildings will be the centerpiece and i hope they're the template of what's built to fill in the v
the beginning of the women's equality movement in the united states. >> at that time, women were banned from holding property and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform. >> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined
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